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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
spend $2.64 and still have 50 million people without insurance. if we could get france's health care system, widely regarded as the best in the world, we could eliminate 40% of income taxes and still have the same deficit. if you look at the federal budget numbers, the budget is coming way down. the economy is improving. higher tacks allow us to create jobs where people are investing in things that make commerce work better. all private wealth is built on a foundation of commonwealth. if we replace foundations of granite and sound and that's where steve's ideas lead to, then our superstucktures will have to collapse. >> david, what i'm hearing from you is three words. tax and spend. >> we're going to have to have a rematch here. we're out of time and we don't want to not pay our bills, so i have to take a break. what a great conversation though. thanks for both of you bringing my viewers some really great ideas. i have been warning you about this fiscal cliff for months now. i call it the economic storm of our own making, but some of you think all the talk is overblown. will a failur
and france with some rates above 50%. in the united states, the average income tax rate is 29%. federally, 39.6% is the highest rate. someone will pay in the united states. so for today's q&a, are americans getting a bargain or are europeans getting ripped up? let me go first. 60 seconds on the clock starts right now. economies richard cost money to run. there is misplaced popularity in the libertarian myth that governments don't need to involve themselves in most economic matters and that markets will handle whatever needs to be handled. we need taxes. and we need safety and services and infrastructure in return. in some cases, it is simply more economical for governments to provide services because a scale. health care might be one example. the building and maintenance of smart grids and roads. so think of taxes not as needing to be low but of the return from those taxes of needing to be high. now traditionally, richard, that worked in europe. now it doesn't. they got the math badly wrong. so what once provided a high return is now an utter failure which makes america a tax bargain. but tha
insurance. if we could get france's health care system, widely regarded as the best in the world we could eliminate social security taxes or 80% of individual income taxes and have the same deficit. by the way, if you look at the federal budget numbers the federal budget deficit is coming way down. the economy is improving. higher taxes allow us to create jobs by investing in things that work it. if we replace foundations of granite with sand and that's where steve's ideas lead to, our super structures have to collapse. >> you know, david, i'm hearing three words from you. tax and spend. >> we'll leave it at that. we'll have a rematch to continue the conversation. we don't want to not pay our bills, so i have to take a break. what a great conversation. thanks to you both for bringing the viewers great ideas. stephen moore from the wall street journal and david cay johnston, author of perfectly legal, the covert campaign to benefit the super rich and cheat everyone else, among other books. i have been warning you about the fiscal cliff for months. i call it the economic storm of our own ma
were there. australia, russia, italy, france. england, germany. all over the world. following this story. all the major networks were there. you know, cnn was there, of course. and so this is an international event. and so the churches have a particular role when something like this happens. that is to help people make some kind of sense of it. when it first happened, everyone, including me was in a state of complete shock. i heard, i'm the same as anyone else, a sense of sickening sense of how could this possibly happen. and you try to wrap your mind around it. and comprehend that you can't, it's just impossible. even the ways that we typically try to understand events like this through psychology and they say the man was disturbed and things like that. he certainly was. but in a war, you can understand the cultural and political tensions like this, for a natural disaster this goes way beyond that. even a very sick mentally ill individual, could never just because of that, commit a crime so horrendous. so you're thrown back, on religious concepts, that's the only way to under
on a scale of 1-10 on satisfaction. denmark tops the list at 10, canada at 9, u.s. at 8, france is 7 and japan is a 4. let's compare the satisfaction to the average marginal tax rates people pay in those countries. americans pay on average $41.7% when you factor in federal, state and local taxes, but the dans pay more, 48.1%. and so how come these guys are happier? danish taxes pay for pok post-secondary education. canadas taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. only the japanese actually make sense, they pay higher taxes, 47.2% and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of cnn's fareed zakaria gps and has a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. entitled "tough decisions." i asked him are american taxpayers getting their money's worth. >> imagine a guy in germany, probably he pays particularly if he's upper middle class or upper class, he probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart. though it's not entirely clear once you add value-added consumption tax, f
the list at 10. my home, canada, comes in at 9. the u.s. comes in at an 8, france 7, and japan is a 4. let's compare that satisfaction to the average marginal tax rates people pay in those countries. americans pay on average 4 41.7 when you factor in federal, state, and local taxes. the danes pay more, 48.1%. how come they're happier? because it pays for free education, post secondary, canadi canadians, by the way, pay more than the u.s., as well, 46.4% in taxes. why are they happier? because their taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. we don't know why that happens. the japanese make sense. higher taxes, 47.2%, and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of "fareed zakaria: gps." he's got a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern titled "tough decisions." i asked him, are american taxpayers getting their money's worth? >> imagine a guy in germany. probably he pays, particular pi upper middle class or upper class, probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpa
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)